Tag Archives: child

16 ways to save money on kids’ activities

16 ways to save money on kids’ activities

16 ways to save money on kids’ activities.
We enrolled our daughter in piano lessons when she was 6 years old.
From washing the school’s windows to working on its website, bartering can and does work.
City/county programs: Local governments sometimes offer surprisingly rich programming, often through their parks and rec departments.
Discount websites: Specialty sites such as Certifikid offer discounts on all sorts of kids’ activities, like $125 for an online Java programming class from CodaKid instead of $249.
Internship programs: An older child may be able to get an unpaid internship.
Just search online for a topic you’re interested in and “free online course” and you’re likely to find something.
Ask for a discount on classes if you are enrolling multiple kids, or booking a birthday party or enrolling in camp.
If they don’t offer, ask.
If they don’t offer you a thank-you discount, politely request one, and tell them there are more referrals to come.

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How to Emotionally Prepare Young Kids for the Beginning of the School Year

How to Emotionally Prepare Young Kids for the Beginning of the School Year

How to Emotionally Prepare Young Kids for the Beginning of the School Year.
For grade school kids, the end of summer and start of the school year is an exciting but stressful time.
She suggests that treating concerns as legitimate and understandable, which they mostly are, goes a long way toward normalization and facilitates a more helpful conversation.
What do you like to do at recess?” With the right cues, kids can be pushed to focus on the positives, on opportunity.
Alvord recommends that parents spend the end of the summer on alert for “What if?” questions.
It’s the parent’s responsibility to sift through the signs of worry in order to help the child get through it and re-channel their emotional energy.
“The first thing for parents is to listen carefully to what the kids are saying,” says Alvord.
“Take action, especially if it’s a new school,” says Alvord.
We don’t want to feel isolated.” That said, no matter how prepared a child is for the impending school year, chances are some jitters persist.
But that doesn’t mean parents can’t help equip them to pivot on their emotions and transform all that anxiety into positive energy to kick off the school year.

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6 Questions For Your Child’s Next IEP Meeting

6 Questions For Your Child's Next IEP Meeting

6 Questions For Your Child’s Next IEP Meeting.
The following post was originally featured on We Know Stuff and written by Julie Clarke.
This month is a good time to check in and see how things are going with your child and her program at school.
Grab a notebook (or whatever you use to record notes for school meetings) and work on these six questions before your child’s next IEP meeting.
Think about how your child started the school year.
(Again, the goal, here, isn’t to check this box off, but to note what to keep in the toolbox.)
Write down what is working.
(Remember, some things take time.)
Take time to write down any changes in behavior you have noticed, as well as behaviors that need to change, but aren’t.
Take a note of any possible relationship conflicts (this could be anything from another kid in class to someone from the school).

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Should You Teach Kids to Share?

Should You Teach Kids to Share?

Should You Teach Kids to Share?.
There is a sharing policy at my son’s preschool.
The policy is that a child can keep a toy as long as they want to.
If another child wants the toy, they have to wait until the first child is done with it.
But lately I’ve been noticing a totally different attitude toward sharing in other places we go, and I’m starting to really know exactly why this is the school’s policy.
Another child, a little bit older, wanted to play with the car and was demanding that my friend’s son give him the car.
A typical toddler scuffle ensued, and the other mother told her son, “I guess his mom didn’t teach him how to share.”
From there I watched a mom whose son wanted to drive the car approach my son repeatedly, saying, “OK, now it’s time for you to give him a turn!”
There were a million other little cars for her son to drive, including one that was almost identical.
But it’s a good lesson for you both to learn that this isn’t always possible, and you shouldn’t step all over other people to get these things.

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Ways to Find Out How Your Kids’ School Day Really Was

Ways to Find Out How Your Kids' School Day Really Was

Ways to Find Out How Your Kids’ School Day Really Was.
Every day after school, it’s the same thing.
Through personal trial and error, getting advice from friends with older kids, and some good old-fashioned perseverance, I’ve learned that there are ways to find out how your kid’s school day actually was.
Every parent has gotten the dreaded “fine,” as a reply to questioning how their child’s school day was.
Instead, check out this list of 30 better questions, like “What was the nicest thing you did for someone today?”
If your child’s teacher hasn’t given you a general schedule, ask for one.
Having basic information about what your kid actually did at school is a great tool for starting a conversation.
I’ve learned that trying to talk to her about her day then is a lost cause.
Put down the phone, let the laundry wait until later, and give them your complete attention.
Don’t wait for your parent-teacher conference to get on a first-name basis with your child’s teacher.

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What Do I Need to Know About My Child Starting Kindergarten?

What Do I Need to Know About My Child Starting Kindergarten?

Author: Laurel Elis Niedospial / Source: POPSUGAR Moms For the baby boomers and early Gen Xers, kindergarten was less about academically challenging children and more of a way for kids to socialize. The theory for a long time was that kindergarten was a way to get kids prepared to learn the “real stuff” later. Now, kindergarten is more like first grade. “With […]

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Early Child Development Programs Can Make Children and Parents More Successful, Says Study

Early Child Development Programs Can Make Children and Parents More Successful, Says Study

Author: Crystal Ponti / Source: Parent Co. Having a child, while rewarding, comes with a steep price. The average cost to raise a child to 18 is now $230,000 for a typical family. Diapers, formula, clothing, medical and dental – the expenses often make child care, including early development programs, out of reach for many parents. Yet, a growing body of research […]

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The Childhood Illness You Cannot See

The Childhood Illness You Cannot See

Author: Stephanie Watkins / Source: Parent Co. Of all the potential illnesses, deformities, or complications that you worry your child will encounter from the moment you find out that you are pregnant, Major Depressive Disorder is usually not one that crosses your mind. You read-up on and are well informed by your doctors of potential postpartum depression for mothers. But no one […]

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