Tag Archives: type I hypersensitivity

6 Tricks to Make Halloween Treats a Non-Issue for Your Allergic Kid

6 Tricks to Make Halloween Treats a Non-Issue for Your Allergic Kid

My daughter has multiple food allergies.
Jennifer Roblin takes her seven-year-old non-allergic son trick-or-treating while her husband stays home with their daughter, who is four and has multiple food allergies.
Instead of sifting through all of her son’s candy and reading all of the labels to determine what’s safe, she replaces everything with Enjoy Life Halloween candies.
Her allergic daughter gets to keep whatever is safe for her.
For parents of younger kids who want their kids to experience as much of the “normal” (read: allergy-free) Halloween experience as possible, a little benign trickery goes a long way. Jennifer Devine Pirozzoli usually takes her kids to the homes of other family members, which gives her the opportunity to run up to the door with an entire bag of safe candy from which her child can choose, without ever knowing that that mom hand-picked it in advance.

Continue reading »

5 healthy back-to-school grocery shopping tips

5 healthy back-to-school grocery shopping tips

Now that many of us parents have kids who are back to school, the days are about to get a whole lot busier, and getting healthy meals and snacks on the table becomes a lot more challenging.
Baby food in the market was highly processed and pasteurized, often using additives and preservatives so that it could easily sit on grocery shelves for two to three years without refrigeration — all of the things I knew babies, including mine, didn’t need.
And it had to taste delicious, with no additives or preservatives.
Whole, fresh fruit is always quick and easy.
Read the labels — especially on food marketed toward kids.
The main thing to avoid, of course, is sugar.
Opt for healthy bread instead of snack bars — good bread topped with nut butter, avocado, honey, organic butter, veggies or fresh fruit makes an ideal snack, simple and delicious.
Take time to learn which labels really mean something and read all of the ingredients on the label (even those in fine print).
Check the freezer section and the natural foods aisle for quality bread.
Kids are never too young to start learning how to make healthy food choices.

Continue reading »

5 Questions to Ask When Choosing a Preschool for Your Food Allergy Kid

5 Questions to Ask When Choosing a Preschool for Your Food Allergy Kid

5 Questions to Ask When Choosing a Preschool for Your Food Allergy Kid.
Therefore, when researching preschools for food allergy kids, asking the right questions about the staff, their facility, and their policies to prevent accidents from happening is absolutely crucial.
Parents who don’t have kids with food allergies usually don’t obsess over ingredients the same way as those who do, nor do they use separate cookware to prepare food with those ingredients in question.
How many other kids have food allergies?
You don’t want your kid to be the only one, because not only will it leave them feeling different and possibly isolated from the other kids, but it will also ensure the school has more experience and preparation handling the situation.
How do you designate/communicate which kids have food allergies?
One of the most important ways of preventing a food allergy incident is planning ahead.
Does the school provide lunch or do people bring their own?
This is why some parents of food allergy kids prefer a school that provides lunches themselves.
If children do bring their own lunches, some parents feel more comfortable having their allergy kids eat separately from the other kids.

Continue reading »

10 Things All Allergy Parents Are Sick of Hearing

10 Things All Allergy Parents Are Sick of Hearing

10 Things All Allergy Parents Are Sick of Hearing.
And I certainly didn’t understand what kind of comments allergy parents consistently hear — ranging from the ignorant to the downright hateful.
With her help (and the input of other “allergy moms”), we rounded up the 10 most common things allergy parents are sick of hearing: 1.
Are we living in a socially responsible society, or is it every child for himself?
Ugh I want to punch that food allergy mom in the throat.” The hostility is, sadly, par for the “allergy parent” course.
“Wow your kid is the one with the food allergies?
You didn’t breastfeed long enough!” When you’re trying to give “expert” advice and prognoses to an allergy parent, please be aware that no one has done more research on food allergies than someone whose child could die from food allergies.
Things like, “A little bite won’t hurt,” and “Eh, she’ll grow out of it.” They also hear ignorant comparisons and confusions with other less threatening food allergies (like gluten) or specialty diets.
Plus anaphylaxis is highly unpredictable, even with an EpiPen in near reach.
“Oh I would just DIE without peanut butter, there is practically no reason to live if they can’t have it.” If there’s one thing all allergy parents hear, it’s PITY.

Continue reading »

Breastfeeding a Baby with Food Allergies Has Turned Me into a Paranoid Control Freak

Breastfeeding a Baby with Food Allergies Has Turned Me into a Paranoid Control Freak

He’s crying because he’s in pain or uncomfortable or his reflux is bothering him or he’s hiccuping non-stop — whatever the reason for these middle-of -the-night tears, it’s my fault.
Instead of relaxing and telling myself babies do these things, I immediately start thinking of every little thing I ate in the past few days.
Instead of seeing food as something wonderful that nourishes my baby, I start to see it as the enemy, as something that hurts my baby.
Instead of seeing food as something wonderful that nourishes my baby, I start to see it as the enemy, as something that hurts my baby.
Instead of remembering that my kids are allergic to dairy (and soy and gluten and who knows what else), I start to see those foods as “bad,” a label I swore I would never give any food group as a dietitian.
But to moms of babies with food allergies and intolerances, there’s no doubt: what you eat can have a dramatic effect on your baby.
Once you’ve figured out that it’s food that’s causing the problem, it can be completely empowering as a mom.
I’ve had almost four years of practice and I’m a dietitian by trade, but I still get it wrong some days.
Dairy is by far the most common food group that babies react to, and there are eight foods considered the most common allergens, but with a baby with food allergies or sensitivities, the list can be utterly endless (and seemingly random).
But right now, it’s about taking it one day at a time; one food at a time, until I know exactly what’s safe for my baby.

Continue reading »

Sugar Intake During Pregnancy Could Trigger Kids’ Allergies Later On

Sugar Intake During Pregnancy Could Trigger Kids’ Allergies Later On

Author: Sandi Schwartz / Source: Parent Co. What kind of cravings did you have while you were pregnant? When I was pregnant with my second, I would walk around at three in the morning eating granola bars because I couldn’t sleep and was absolutely starving. I know this wasn’t the smartest habit because those granola bars were packed with sugar. Our doctors […]

Continue reading »

Can You Use Nasal Spray During Pregnancy? That Congestion Is No Joke

Can You Use Nasal Spray During Pregnancy? That Congestion Is No Joke

Author: Cat Bowen / Source: Romper I was constantly congested when I was pregnant — it’s like my nose was a clogged pipe that always dripped. I’m also severely allergic to mold and was pregnant mostly in the fall and winter — gah. Little helped, like nasal spray, but, can you use nasal spray during pregnancy, or is it just as off […]

Continue reading »

How This One Pregnancy Craving Could Be Causing Your Kid’s Allergies

How This One Pregnancy Craving Could Be Causing Your Kid’s Allergies

For a long time, though, I didn’t touch those devilish treats because of dietary changes I made.
Then I became pregnant and I wanted Swiss rolls all the time.
But I may have to repent for that sweet tooth later on.
New research claims that all those sweets during pregnancy may be what causes kid’s allergies.
According to CNN, a study published Wednesday in the European Respiratory Journal found a link between high-sugar food intake during pregnancy and an increased risk of allergies and allergic asthma among children.
What they found is that kids born to parents with the highest sugar consumption during pregnancy were 73 percent more likely to have two or more allergies by 7 years old, according the Sioux City Journal.
The researchers also discovered that children born to mothers with a heavy sweet tooth were twice as likely to have allergic asthma.
The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America states that allergies affect as many as 40 percent of children in the United States, with asthma and other allergic diseases being the third most common chronic issue in children and teens.
I know I ate a lot of sweets during my pregnancy.
I suffer from asthma and certain food allergies myself, and that’s most likely why my son has asthma as well — not because I craved Swiss rolls at 4 a.m.

Continue reading »